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Windsurfer Anatomy 101 - Parts of a Windsurfer

by Windshark
2011-05-29

Click the diagram for details.
nose Hull tail Foot Straps Port Rail Daggerboard Cassette Mast Track Starboard Rail Deck Click the diagram for details.
Fin Dagger Board Rail Step Tail Fin Box Click the diagram for details.
Battens Mast Luff Sleeve Boom Uphaul Mast Extension Downhaul Foot Leech Head Luff Luff Sleeve Clew Outhaul Mast Base

Windsurf Board Hull Hull - the basic structure of the windsurf board. Hull construction varies widely among different boards. Many windsurf board hulls are made from high-tech and light-weight materials such as carbon. Often performance hulls are constructed from a combination of epoxy, fiberglass, and wood or carbon in several layers. Other windsurf board hulls are made of durable plastic encasing a foam inner structure.
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Port Side - the left side of the board as it faces forward.
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Starboard Side - the starboard side of the board as it faces forward.
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Windsurf Board Rail Rails - the port and starboard edges of the board. Because the rails are the intersection of the wetted part of the hull and the dry part of the hull, they can affect the performance characteristics of the board. Soft rails (or rounded rails) will tend to allow for more looseness in the board's maneuvering, but less forward drive. While hard edged rails have good forward drive and planing ability, but less sensitive maneuverability.
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Windsurf Board Nose Nose - the front tip of the board. Nose configuration can affect how a board responds to water head on, such as waves. Nose width may affect a board's ability to achieve a plane early. The nose can also affect how a board handles freestyle, as some freestyle maneuvers require the nose to be buried in the water.
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Windsurf Board Tail Tail - the back of the board. The tail is a crucial point on the board because at speed, this is where most of the water pressure is focused. Narrow tails can sometimes deal with choppier conditions with ease, but do not have the stability of wide tails. Rounded tails may allow a board to turn more easily, but have less forward drive and planing ability. Straight edged tails may plane quickly or sail upwind efficiently, but make it more difficult for the board to turn.
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Windsurf Board Deck Deck - the top of the windsurf board. The deck is what the sailor will spend most of his or her time standing on in an ideal world. Windsurf board decks are almost always made to prevent sailors from slipping. To achieve this, many decks have a sandpaper-like finish that is very rough to the touch, and neoprene padding under the foot straps or in key positions on the deck for comfort. Many boards have a deck covered with a soft foam, often called EVA or tough skin, which is very soft and comfortable to the touch. Soft decks also prevent slippage, but do not have the powerful foot-grip of rough decks.
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Windsurfer Mast Track Mast Track - the slot where the mast base is inserted. Mast track position can vary on different boards. Most boards constructed after the year 2000 have mast tracks somewhere between fifty and sixty inches from the tail. Boards before 2000 varied more, with mast tracks often starting more than seventy inches from the tail. Most mast tracks are simply a slot where a brass t-nut is inserted, and the mast base is screwed down into position. Other mast tracks may have a sliding mechanism already built into the board, but must use only mast bases designed for that particular mast track.
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Windsurfer Mast Base Mast Base/Foot - the assembly attached to the mast track that inserts into the bottom of the mast or mast extension. Mast bases also vary widely in configuration, but they all have some form of universal joint to allow the rig to be positioned. They usually have a spring clip mechanism or a pin that clicks into the mast extension.
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Windsurfer Universal Joint U-Joint - the universal joint allows the rig to be positioned in any degree of rotation at any vertical angle, and is what allows windsurfing as we know it to be possible. U-joints may be constructed of rubber, plastic, or a mechanical assembly. Old u-joints are prone to breakage. <
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Dagger Board Cassette Dagger-board Cassette - the housing that contains the dagger-board. Most modern long boards, entry-level boards, and one-design boards have a retractable dagger-board, meaning the dagger-board cassette must be long enough to house the dagger-board fully retracted. The cassettes are often replaceable.
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Dagger Board Dagger-board (centerboard) - the center fin or foil that provides stability and easier upwind sailing. Dagger-boards are very useful for many beginners or any light wind sailor because of the efficiency of which they allow a board to sail upwind. Most dagger-boards are retractable via a foot lever. Some dagger-boards are no more than a center fin inserted into a screw-in housing at the center of the board.
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Fin Fin - the skeg or wing-like foil on the bottom of the tail of the board. The fin is often considered as crucial in windsurfing as a sail, as the board cannot maneuver or be controlled without a fin. Since the fin is the maneuvering focal point of the board, fin shape can affect the boards maneuverability and performance strongly. The fin size is a primary determiner of what sail range the board will carry. Rounded fins cause the board to turn quickly, while straight fins will allow the board to stay pointed in a given direction and more easily sail upwind with sufficient speed.
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Fin Box Fin Box - the slot that houses the fin. Fin boxes vary according to manufacturer or the board designer's whims. Some fin boxes require one screw. Other fin boxes require two. Some hinge into position and are secured with a square nut, others just screw straight through the top of the tail. Finding the fin that fits a given finbox is sometimes a challenge. Fin box types include powerbox, tuttle, deep tuttle, slot a/e, and trim box.
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Foot Straps Foot Straps - the straps on the deck of the board that hold the rider's feet in place in high speeds. Foot straps are most often used when the board is on a plane. Some boards have several foot strap holes to allow for variable foot strap positions. Generally, foot straps placed in positions closer to the center allow for greater control, stability, and maneuverability, while foot straps placed further out are better for high speed sailing.
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Step Tail Step Tail - a ledge on the underside of the board's tail that lessens the wetted surface area at high speeds. Step tails on boards such as the Kona One-design and RRD Long Rider are very apparent. While step tails on smaller boards such as the Starboard I-sonic, Futura, or RRD X-fire are a little more subtle.
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Rig - 1. the method of preparing a windsurfing sail, mast, and boom for sailing. Windsurfing Rig 2. the portion of the windsurfer that includes the mast, sail, boom, and attached lines.
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Windsurfing Mast Mast - the flexible pole that provides the main structure of the rig. Masts curve and follow the leading edge of the sail. Windsurfing masts are designed to be both flexible and strong. Mast materials can vary, usually fiberglass, carbon, or some combination of the two. Full carbon masts are lighter and easier to handle. Mast length is important, and sail requirements determine the size of mast that is to be used.
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Windsurfing Mast Extension Mast Extension - the cylindrical object that joins the mast base to the bottom of the mast. The mast extension inserts into the bottom of the mast, and clicks onto the mast base. Mast extensions are typically adjustable to add more or less length to the mast determined by the requirements of a given sail. Mast extensions can vary in length. The downhaul system is usually part of the mast base.
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Windsurfing Sail Sail - the wing-like structure that catches the wind and provides power to the windsurfer. Sails vary in size and configuration to fit the sailor and the conditions to be sailed in. Larger sails are more powerful, but harder to control in strong winds, while smaller sails are easier to control and quite efficient in high winds, they may not keep the board moving as much as a larger sail when the wind is weaker. Sails are made out of vinyl, dacron, plastic monofilm, kevlar, and/or usually a combination of all of these materials.
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Luff Sleeve Luff - the forward edge of the sail. Luff curvature may vary slightly among different sails.
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Luff Sleeve - the sleeve at the front of the sail where the mast is inserted. Luff sleeves have an opening in the center where the boom can be clamped to the mast. The luff sleeve is also where the cambers (if the sail has any) can be found.
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Head Head - the top of the sail. This is also where the head cap houses the tip of the mast.
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Windsurf Sail Foot Foot - the bottom edge of the sail. The sail foot is sometimes cut high, or low, depending on the sail configuration. For example, wave sails have high-cut foots, while race sails have low-cut foots.
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Windsurf Sail Leech Leech - the back or the trailing edge of the sail. The leech is significant because it is where air pressure leaves the sail. Most modern sails have leeches that are designed to be loose when rigged properly. This allows a subtle twist in the upper half of the sail and a more aerodynamic shape.
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Windsurf Sail Clew Clew - the back corner of the sail. The clew is often used as a reference point in sail handling. It is also the point where the outhaul tension is applied.
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Windsurf Sail Battens Battens - the flexible but hard ribs that are built into the sail to help maintain sail-shape. Battens are usually fiberglass or carbon, very flexible, and their tension can be adjusted when necessary.
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Boom Boom - the rigid bar that runs across the sail and controls sail positioning. This is what the sailor holds onto for sail handling. Boom length varies and is determined by sail requirements, and booms are usually adjustable via a telescoping tail-piece. The outhail line and pulleys are housed in the tail piece and run through the grommet in the sail's clew. Booms are constructed of aluminum, fiberglass, or carbon.
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Uphaul Uphaul (line) - the rope that is used to pull the sail out of the water and into a sailing position. Uphaul lines are attached to the boom head and looped around the mast foot.
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downhaul Downhaul (line) - the line that runs through the bottom grommet or pulleys of the sail and into the mast extension. The downhaul tension is what affects the overall curvature of the mast, and ultimately the shape of the sail. More downhaul tension can de-power the sail, but make it more efficient in higher winds. This also causes the leech of the sail to become more loose. Less downhaul makes the sail more powerful in light wind, but ultimately harder to control.
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Outhaul Outhaul (line) - the line that runs through the grommet in the clew of the sail, and into the tail-piece of the boom. The outhaul affects how flat or full the sail will be. More outhaul means a flatter, more responsive shape to the sail. Less outhaul means a fuller, more powerful shape to the sail.
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Harness Lines Harness Lines - the lines that run from the center of effort on the boom forming a loop that a sailor can hook into with a harness for leverage. In high winds using the harness lines are almost essential. The harness lines allow a sailor to use body weight rather than muscle to power up the sail. Harness lines used in combination with the foot straps can allow a board to reach maximum speed.
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Comments
 
On 2015-02-13, harpaulsandhu wrote:

thanks sharing
 
On 2015-02-13, harpaulsandhu wrote:

 
On 2012-12-23, mulva wrote:

Hi, I'm looking for a Windsurfer one design mastbase with “friction set” foot’. Would be great if someone has one which I could purchase?


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